Maine Maritime Academy
Prospective Students Alumni Parents Students Directions Home

Employers

Employers Recent graduates have had multiple professional job offerings, before and after graduation. Over the last three years, an average of 90% of our graduates have found professional employment within 30 days of receiving their diploma. Here is a sample listingof the companies who have hired them.

Shipping Related

 

Shipping Companies

  • Afloat Operations (Mates & Engineers)
  • Shoreside Management


Note: This is a sample listing.

3PSC
Acadian Whale Watcher
Alaska Marine Highway System
American Bureau of Shipping

American Maritime Officers
American Overseas Marine Corp.
APL
American Steamship Company
Army Corps of Engineers
Atlantic Marine, Inc.

Bar Harbor Whale Watch
Bermuda Container Line Ltd
Bouchard Transportation, Inc.
BP Marine Ltd

Casco Bay Lines
Chesapeake Marine Tours
C-Mar Vessel Management
ConocoPhillips (dba Polar Tankers)
Cross Sound Ferry
Crowley Maritime Corp
Crowley Petroleum Transport

Diamond Offshore Drilling
Donjon Marine
Downeast Windjammer Cruises

Edison Chouest Offshore
ExxonMobil

Foss Maritime

Great Lakes Dredging

Hartley Marine
Hornbeck Offshore
Hornblower Marine Services
Hy-line Cruises

Interlake Steamship Company
Interocean Ugland Management
J. Ray McDermott
K-Sea Transportation
Keystone Shipping Company
Kirby Corporation
Lake Champlain Transportation

Maersk Lines, Ltd
Maine State Ferry Service
Marine Spill Responder Corp. (MSRC)
Mass Bay Lines
Mates, Masters, & Pilots
McAllister Towing
MEBA
Military Sealift Command
Miss Marquette Casino
Moran Towing
National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency
National Oceanic & Atmospheric Admin. (NOAA)
Noble Drilling

Oceaneering
Overseas Shipholding Group

Premier Pacific Seafood
Pro Nav Ship Management, Inc.
Puget Sound Naval Shipyard
Sargeant Marine
Schooner BOWDOIN
Scripp's Institute
Seabulk International
Seacor Marine
Sea Education Association (SEA)
Sealift, Inc.
TECO Transportation
Tidewater Marine
Transocean
TYCO

United Arab Shipping
U.S. Shipping Partners, LLC
U.S. Government

Waterman Steamship Corp
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
(Back)

 

Engineering-Landbased

  • Design
  • Operations
  • Manufacturing
  • Management
  • Research and Development


Note: This is a sample listing.

ABB Automation
ABB Turbo Systems
AT&T
ALSTOM Power Inc.
Avondale Industries, Inc.

Babcock and Wilcox
Barclay Water Management, Inc.
Bath Iron Works
Bechtel
Bollinger Shipyards, Inc.
Calpine
Calvert Cliffs Power Station
Central Maine Power
Chittenden Solid Waste District
Cianbro Corp.
Connecticut Light and Power

Coors Brewing Company
Covanta Energy
Crown ESA, Inc.
Cummins Marine
Dow Chemical Company
Duke Energy

El Paso Corporation
Exeter Energy
Expeditors
Flamingo Resort
Florida Power and Light
General Dynamics - Electric Boat

General Electric
G.E. Power Generation
Georgia Pacific
Gibbs & Cox, Inc.
Guido & Perla Naval Architecture

Indeck Power Equipment Co.
International Paper
Ingersoll-Rand
Life Cycle Engineering
Lockheed Martin
Lucent Technologies

Maine Energy Recovery Company (MERC)
Mead Paper
National Energy Production Corporation
National Steel & Shipbuilding Co.

Naval Surface Warfare Center
Nichols-Portland
Northeast Utilities System
Northrop Grumman
Oceaneering
Nuclear Regulatory Commission

Ocean State Power
PIC
Portsmouth Naval Shipyard
Power Specialists Associates

Pratt and Whitney
Progress Energy
Public Service Enterprise Group
Ridgewood Power Management
Seaworthy Systems, Inc.

The Shaw Group
Siemens Power Corporation
Siemens
Strategic Maintenance Solutions
Tampa Electric

Turbo Care
U.S. Government
Vermont Yankee
Wartsila
Wheelabrator Technologies
Wisconsin Electric
(Back)

 

Marine Biology & Marine Sciences

  • Graduate School
  • Research
  • Naturalist
  • Marine Policy
  • Field Operations


Note: This is a sample listing.

Accutest Environmental
Alaskan Observers, Inc.
American Red Cross
Analytic Environmental
Boston Harbor Cruises

California Marine Institute

Catalina Island Marine Institute
Carnegie Science Center
Florida Dept. of Environmental Protection
Haskins Research Laboratories

Lamont-Doherty
Maine Dept. of Marine Resources
Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences
Mystic Aquarium
NOAA

New Hampshire Fish & Game
Ocean Mammal Institute
Ohio Division of Natural Resources
Outdoor Education, Inc.
Prince William Sound Aquaculture Corporation

Science Applications International Corporation
Scripps Institute of Oceanography
So. Florida Water Mgmt. District
Soundwaters
U.S. Government
Washington Dept. of Fish & Wildlife
Wheelabrator Technologies
Wood Hole Oceanographic Institution

 


Graduate Schools
Auburn University
Brown University
Florida Institute of Technology
Georgia Institute of Technology
Maine Maritime Academy
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Thomas Jefferson University
University of Connecticut
University of Delaware
University of Houston
University of Rhode Island
Southampton University, England
(Back)

 

Business & Logistics

  • Operations
  • Analysis
  • Transportation Management
  • Logistics and Supply Chain Management
  • Materials, Purchasing, and Production Management
  • Sales


Note: This is a sample listing.


American Commercial Barge Line
American Classic Voyages
Americana Lykes
ARINC
Bath Iron Works

Cavendish Farms
Central Maine Harley Davidson
DHL
Eddie Bauer
Enterprise
Expeditor's, Inc.

Federal Marine Terminals
Hannaford
The Hinckley Company
Honda Manufacturing
Irving
KPMG Consultants

L.L. Bean
Maine Maritime Academy
Mass Bay Lines
Military Sealift Command

PETCO
Poland Springs
St. Lawrence and Atlantic Railroad
Thomson Reuters Financial
UPS Supply Chain Solutions
U.S. Government

(Back)

What is a deck officer?

Marine Transportation Operations, Vessel Operations & Technology and Small Vessel Operations students study the safe navigation of a vessel and management of the deck department and are training to become deck officers or mates. Deck officers or "mates" perform the work for captains on vessels when they are on watch, like determining the course and speed, maneuver to avoid hazards, and continuously monitor the vessels position using charts and navigational aids. They also maintain logs and other records tracking the ships movements. They ensure that the proper procedures and safety practices are followed, check that machinery and equipment are in good working order, and oversee the loading and discharging of cargo or passengers. Mates supervise crew members engaged in maintenance and the primary upkeep of the vessel.

All mates "stand" watch for specified periods, usually a 4 hours on/8 hours off rotation. When more than one mate is necessary aboard a ship, they typically are designated 3rd Mate, 2nd mate, and Chief Mate. However, on smaller vessels, there may be only one mate who alternates watches with the captain.

Under the direction of the Mates, Able Seamen (AB's)perform duties such as standing watch for navigation, security, or communications, operate hoists, cranes, and winches to load cargo or set gangways; operate and maintain on-deck equipment and ship rigging, and handle lines to secure vessels to piers or other vessels.

Mates and ABs work primarily aboard commercial (merchant marine) or Military Sealift ships, in water transportation services (tugs, research vessels, offshore supply vessels and other water craft) and on passenger vessels (cruise ships, ferries, dinner/casino boats, traditional sail vessels, sightseeing/charter boats). Work schedules vary, depending on vessel type, but separation could be up to 90 days or more . Employment outlook is favorable with competitive starting salaries.

Licenses

Before permitted to work aboard a commercial vessel, mariners must complete a rigorous licensing process. The U.S. Coast Guard promulgates the requirements for documentation and issuance of merchant mariner licenses for Deck and Engineer officers. USCG Deck officer licenses are issued by:

  • grade (e.g., 3rd Mate*, 2nd Mate, Chief Mate, Master (Captain), Mate* and Operator),
  • vessel tonnage (from not more than 5 ton to 50t, 100t, 200t*, 500t*, 1600t*, or unlimited tonnage*),
  • means of propulsion (i.e., Steam*, Motor*, Sail or Auxiliary Sail*),
  • route (e.g., Inland, Great Lakes, Near Coastal* or Oceans*),
  • and any vessel type restrictions.

License advancement is based on documented sea time, professional recertifications, and/or U.S.C.G. exams.

Certificates

Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW)* - STCW for seafarers set international standards for masters, officers and watch personnel on seagoing merchant ships. STCW training is intended to ensure that seafarers are aware of the hazards of working on a vessel and can respond appropriately in an emergency.

A STCW Certificate will be issued to mariners who meet the STCW requirements and is separate from U.S. Merchant Mariner license. STCW requires seafarers be provided with "familiarization training" and "basic safety training" which includes: basic fire fighting, elementary first aid, personal survival techniques, and personal safety and social responsibility. Mariners entering training programs after August 1, 1998, MMA license program students included, are required to meet the current international competency standards.

Automatic Radar Plotting Aids (ARPA)* and Global Maritime Distress Safety System (GMDSS)* for deck officers serving on vessels equipped with those systems.

* - available at MMA

What is a Ships' Engineer?

The propulsion plant of a vessel and management of the engineering department is the responsibility of the engineer officers. Ship engineers operate, maintain, and repair propulsion engines, boilers, generators, pumps, and other machinery. Merchant marine vessels usually have four engineering officers: chief engineer, a 1st assistant engineer, 2nd assistant engineer, and 3rd assistant engineer.

Assistant engineers stand periodic watches, overseeing the safe operation of engines and machinery. All engineers "stand" watch for specified periods, usually a 4 hours on/ 8 hours off rotation. Engineers supervise crew members engaged in maintenance and the primary up-keep of the engineering plant.

Engineers work primarily on commercial ships (merchant marine) or Military Sealift ships, in water transportation services (such as working on tugs, charter boats and other watercraft) and on vessels which carry passengers (such as cruise ships, casino boats, sightseeing boats, and ferries) Rotation schedules vary from 2 weeks up to 120 days, depending on vessel type. Employment outlook is favorable with competitive starting salaries.

Because of a their thorough knowledge of the design, operation, and maintenance of ship systems, sometimes referred to as a "floating city, marine engineers' career opportunities outside the shipping realm are plentiful and lucrative.

Licenses

The U.S. Coast Guard promulgates the requirements for documentation and issuance of merchant mariner licenses for Deck and Engineer officers. Engineer officer licenses are issued by:

  • grade (e.g., Chief Engineer, First Assistant Engineer, Second Assistant Engineer, Third Assistant Engineer, Limited Chief Engineer, Limited Assistant Engineer and Designated Duty Engineer),
  • means of propulsion (i.e., Steam, Motor, or Gas Turbine),
  • horsepower (from 1,000 to unlimited horsepower),
  • and route (e.g., Near Coastal or Oceans).

License advancement is based on documented sea time, professional recertifications, and/or U.S.C.G. exams.

Certificates

Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW) - STCW for seafarers set international standards for masters, officers and watch personnel on seagoing merchant ships. STCW training is intended to ensure that seafarers are aware of the hazards of working on a vessel and can respond appropriately in an emergency.

A STCW Certificate will be issued to mariners who meet the STCW requirements and is separate from U.S. Merchant Mariner license. STCW requires seafarers be provided with "familiarization training" and "basic safety training" which includes: basic fire fighting, elementary first aid, personal survival techniques, and personal safety and social responsibility. Mariners entering training programs after August 1, 1998, MMA license program students included, are required to meet the current international competency standards.

"...one of the highest professional placement rates of any college in the U.S."

Placement--Director of MMA Career Services

MMA Viewbook | MMA Catalog | MMA Department Brochures | Academic Calendar

Maine Maritime's impeccable reputation, plus superb academic programs, give you a compelling advantage in the competition for top jobs. Whether at sea or ashore, Maine Maritime graduates are in high demand. Why? We know our job, we do it well, and there is a need.

Close to 100 percent of Maine Maritime graduates land jobs in their chosen field before graduation or soon after - one of the highest career placement rates of any college or university in the United States. With excellent starting salaries and benefits, you are on the way to professional success and personal satisfaction!

Visit our Career Services home page to learn about the exciting, rewarding, and numerous career opportunities that await Maine Maritime graduates.

Quick Links